Prayer of Repentance

Offered by Anneke Rabe

Father, I submit this day, the 24th of November 2017, here in Cape Town in the Parliament of South Africa before You and ask that You will help me to pray this Prayer of Repentance.
I stand before You and every Black, Coloured, Khoi, San and Indian person of SA. I stand in the gap as an intercessor and as a White Afrikaner woman. I stand for all White people in South Africa – both Afrikaans and English. I stand for the White people of the past, present and future generations. I also stand in the gap for those White people of SA whose hearts are hard and who will never say sorry.

I ask forgiveness today to all my fellow Black, Coloured, Khoi, San and Indian South Africans. We, as White people have sinned against you, over and over again. Today we repent unconditionally.

I ask forgiveness for the way slaves were treated in SA from 1653 to 1834. I ask forgiveness for the land that was dispossessed from that time onward and for the way Khoikhoi men and women became incorporated into colonial society as low-status servants. I ask forgiveness for the White domination and the human rights violations.
I ask forgiveness for the laws and regulations that the Dutch brought in, in 1788 that separated White people from Black people. I ask forgiveness that these laws continued after the British occupation of 1795 and thereafter. I ask forgiveness for the land and livestock dispossession that resulted in wars between the colonial settlers and Khoikhoi, San, Xhosa, Zulu, Sotho and a number of other ethnic groups.

I ask forgiveness for the following racist legislation; The Parliamentary Voters Registration Act of 1887, The Franchise and Ballot Act that was passed in 1892 and The Glen Grey Act of 1894.

I ask forgiveness for not including Black people when SA became a Union in 1910. Forgive us that even the architecture of the Union buildings depicts only English and Afrikaans White South Africans and not Black, Coloured, Khoi, San and Indian South Africans. Forgive us for the severe way that we rejected you – our fellow South Africans.

I ask forgiveness here – today – the 24th of November 2017 in Cape Town- in the parliament of South Africa- for the land act of 1913 that was first passed here. I ask forgiveness on behalf of White South Africans for the many broken covenants before and after that act. I ask forgiveness for the many acts of segregation and Apartheid that came after that Act. I ask forgiveness that because of that Act, we as Whites have deprived you and your ancestors from owning the right to own land in your own country.

I ask your forgiveness for the major socio-economic repercussions that that act had. I ask forgiveness that because of that act we turned your people from independent people to dependent people. I ask forgiveness for the ruthless manner in which the Land Act was imposed. I ask forgiveness for the many evictions and for the way we abused your people through this Act to get cheap forced labour. I ask forgiveness for the way we treated the Indian and Chinese workers who were brought to SA as migrant labourers. I ask forgiveness that my people made your people feel like outcasts in their own country.

I ask forgiveness for all oppressive legislation and especially the following: The 1927 Native Administration Act. The Natives (Urban Areas) Amendment Act of 1930. The 1936 Native Trust and Land Act. The Prohibition of Mixed Marriages Act, of 1949. The Population Registration Act of 1950. The Group Areas Act of 1950. The Natives Urban Areas Act of 1952. The Separate Amenities Act of 1953. The Native Labour Act of 1953.

I ask forgiveness that under Apartheid representation of Black, Coloured, Khoi, San and Indian black voters was ended.
I ask forgiveness for the cattle culling. I ask forgiveness for the loss of 87% of the land. I ask forgiveness for the homelands. I ask forgiveness for the unfair taxes.

I ask forgiveness for the way we treated you. I repent of the pride of the White people. I repent that we thought that we are better than you. It is a sin. I repent for the way that we shamed, humiliated and oppressed you, your mothers, your fathers, your brothers, your sisters, your uncles and your aunts. I ask forgiveness for the derogatory names we called you. I ask forgiveness that we did not treat the Black, Coloured, Khoi, San and Indian leaders in SA with respect.

Mamphela– you are here today – first of all – thank you, for coming. You represent a long history of the black people’s pain and struggle for change in this country. Today here in front of everyone I want to ask your forgiveness for the way we as White people treated you, your people, and your leaders, many of whom died in our prisons and elsewhere.

I ask forgiveness for the killings of those who were murdered under the evil system of Apartheid. I ask forgiveness for the people that died in Sharpeville, Soweto and many other places. I especially ask forgiveness for the death of the children who died in Sharpeville, Soweto and many other places.
I repent for the inferior education that you received under apartheid. I repent that our people forced your people to be educated in Afrikaans. I repent that we robbed you of a proper education.

I ask forgiveness for the pain, anguish, the fear and shock that you had to endure under Apartheid. I ask forgiveness for our ignorance. I ask forgiveness for the pass laws. I ask forgiveness for the detentions. I ask forgiveness for the imprisonments. I ask forgiveness for the tortures. I ask forgiveness for the violence.
As a woman and a mother, I repent on behalf of all White women that influenced our husbands and children to be racist and to treat you harshly. I ask forgiveness for our extreme nationalistic ideals and that because of that, you suffered so much.

I ask forgiveness that not more of us stood for justice. I ask forgiveness for the idolatry of the Whites in South Africa. I ask forgiveness to you and to God that our idolatry even entered our churches. I ask forgiveness that those of us who knew God did not do more to reflect to you the love of Christ in our words and actions.

Above all I repent today of the way the Church condoned Apartheid and because of that many turned away from God. I thank God and those of you who stayed true to the Gospel of Jesus Christ in these terrible times of apartheid. Lord I pray that you will open our eyes to those things we continue to do that still cause offence and hurt to others.

Lord please forgive us for not doing more to understand and implement true restitution. Lord please show us the way. Lord please quiet the blood that is calling out over our nation, that was spilt during all these years of white oppression.

Lord please turn the tide and heal our land.
Your kingdom come, your will be done for South Africa.
I ask this in the name of Jesus Christ
Amen

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*